Home Candice Bennett

Author Archives

November 30, 1913

Today's session of the National American Woman Suffrage Association's convention got off to a rousing start with the unfurling of a giant banner reading: "We Demand An Amendment To The United States Constitution Enfranchising Women." This was immediately followed by thunderous applause, stirring speeches, and a
Read more

November 29, 1913

An atmosphere of optimism and great enthusiasm is greeting the delegates arriving for the 45th annual convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association. The optimism is justified by the rapid progress woman suffrage has been making recently, and the enthusiasm is generated by the presence of many
Read more

November 28, 1917

A second consecutive day of victory for the "Silent Sentinels" who have been picketing along the White House fence in favor of woman suffrage! The last of the imprisoned pickets had their sentences commuted today by the same judge who had originally imposed the outrageously long prison terms on them. Yesterday,
Read more

November 27, 1917

ALICE PAUL IS FREE! She and all other hunger-striking suffragists have been unconditionally and unexpectedly released from D.C.'s District Jail by Police Court Judge Alexander Mullowney, the same judge who had originally sentenced them. They had been serving terms of up to seven months on false and normally minor
Read more

November 26, 1917

ven though there were no official announcements or outward signs of activity today at Washington, D.C.'s District Jail, where the suffragist prisoners are being held, there appears to be some serious negotiating going on behind the scenes. And while Alice Paul has refused food since November 5th, and been
Read more

November 25, 1917

The struggle of the imprisoned suffragists continues today in D.C.'s Washington Asylum and Jail, which most people around here simply call the "District Jail." But now, instead of just a relatively small number of suffrage prisoners in his custody, Warden Zinkham must now deal with several dozen, nineteen of whom
Read more

November 24, 1917

Another day in court for some "Silent Sentinel" suffragists who have been imprisoned for picketing along the White House fence. However, unlike many previous occasions, they were not in a courtroom to face more charges, but to make their own accusations against Occoquan Workhouse authorities for the abuses they've
Read more

November 23, 1917

Everyone in Judge Edmund Waddill's packed courtroom in Alexandria, Virginia, this morning was shocked by the weak and emaciated condition of the hunger-strikers among the suffrage prisoners brought out of Occoquan Workhouse for a hearing they had requested in U.S. District Court. Even some of the healthiest among
Read more

November 22, 1917

Two major developments today regarding the suffragists imprisoned in Occoquan Workhouse. The most encouraging action was a statement from the U.S. Department of Justice. It will conduct an official investigation into the atrocious conditions and acts of brutality inflicted on the "Silent Sentinels" serving time in
Read more

November 21, 1917

The number of imprisoned suffragists being subjected to the ordeal of force-feeding has suddenly increased from two to five. Lucy Burns and Dora Lewis, leaders of the hunger strike at Occoquan Workhouse, were transferred out yesterday and sent to join Alice Paul and Rose Winslow in the hospital ward of Washington,
Read more