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Beulah Amidon

Beulah Amidon

Beulah Amidon

Ms. Amadon was born in Fargo, N.D., the daughter of the late U.S. District Judge Charles Freemont Amidon and Mrs. Beulah McHenry Amidon. After graduation from Barnard College, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa, Mrs. Amidon studied law at the University of Southern California. She began her career as press secretary of the National Woman’s Party, a writer for the Committee on Public Information and feature writer for the Non-Partisan League. Called the “prettiest suffragist” by the other women, she was jailed after picketing on August 15th, 1917. On that day, fifty purple, white and gold flags were destroyed by a mob led by sailors in uniform. Ms. Amidon was knocked down by one of the sailors. In prison she remembered the “dear funny, sickening little kindnesses prisoners showed me…especially the Negroes are good to us.” She encouraged the other suffragists and told them the “big world is watching — and learning – and admiring, and pretty soon the job…will be done.”