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Suffragists in Massachusetts

Eleanor Calnan, Methuen: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Josephine Collins, Framingham: Demonstrated at Wilson’s return to port of Boston in Feb. 1919, served eight days in Charles St. Jail.

Betty Connolly, West Newton: Demonstrated at Wilson’s return in port of Boston, served eight days in Charles St. Jail.

Ella Findeisen, Lawrence: Picketed the White House in 1917.

Martha Foley, Dorchester: Demonstrated at Wilson’s return to port of Boston in Feb. 1919, served eight days in Charles St. Jail.

Francis (sp?) Fowler, Brookline: Demonstrated in Boston in Feb 1919, arrested and served eight days in Charles St. Jail.

Mrs. J. Irving Gross, Boston: Charter member of Massachusetts branch of NWP. Demonstrated in Lafayette Square in 1918, jailed 15 days. Demonstrated at Wilson’s return to port of Boston in Feb. 1919, served eight days in Charles St. Jail.

Julia Ward Howe, Boston: She helped to establish the New England Woman Suffrage Association in 1868 and later worked with the American Woman Suffrage Association and the General Federation of Women’s Clubs International. Was a poet and song writer.

Louise Mayo, Framingham: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Katherine Morey, Brookline: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Agnes H. Morey, Brookline: Chairman of the NWP Massachussetts branch, member of NWP Advisory Council. Picketed White House in 1917 and a “Suffrage Special” speaker.

Lucretia Mott, Nantucket: Called for 1848 convention with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and others.

Maud Wood Park, Boston: Led NAWSA congressional campaign for suffrage amendment.

Sarah Remond (1826-1887(?)), Salem: An African American and anti-slavery advocate who with her brother, Charles, spoke at the national woman’s rights convention in New York City in 1858.  A member of the American Equal Rights Association she was a guest lecturer and toured the Northeast campaigning for universal suffrage.  Discouraged by the split in the woman suffrage movement after the Civil War, she moved to Italy in 1866, where she studied medicine. Her departure from the US suggests the hopelessness she felt about African American women ever achieving equality in the US.

Rosa M Heinzen Roewer, Belmont: Demonstrated at Wilson’s return to port of Boston in Feb. 1919, served eight days in Charles St. Jail.

Josephine St. Pierre Ruffin (1842-1924), Boston: A journalist and noted abolitionist before the Civil War, a member of the Massachusetts Woman Suffrage Association in 1875, and American Woman Suffrage Association, and Black woman’s club leader.  She was the wife of George L. Ruffin, one of the woman suffrage representatives from Boston in the state legislature.  In 1895, she convened the first conference of the National Federation of Afro-American Women, probably the first national organization of Black women, in Boston, thereby becoming a leader in the Black woman’s club movement.   She was personally discriminated against when seeking to represent her club at the 1900 convention of the General Federation of Women’s Clubs, leading to the virtual segregation of Black and white women’s clubs.

Lucy Stone, Unknown City: Speaker on abolition and women’s right to vote. Led American Woman Suffrage Association.

Camilla Whitcomb, Worcester: Chaired the Fourth Congressional District of Massachusetts NWP. Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.