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Suffragists in New York

Mary Edith Ainge, Jamestown: Picketed Wilson’s White House in 1917.

Susan B. Anthony, Rochester: Leader, speaker, and organizer of suffrage movement in 19th century. Most famous suffragist.

Alva Smith (Mrs. O.H.P.) Belmont, New York City: Funded move of NAWSA HQ from Warren, Ohio to New York City,  Major funder of NWP, on board of Congressional Union and then NWP.

Harriot Stanton Blatch, New York City: Major suffrage leader in New York, organized suffrage parades there.

Hilda Blumberg, New York City: Picketed Wilson’s White House in 1917.

Inez Milholland Boissevain, New York City: Suffragist leader in New York. Was herald on white horse leading March 3, 1913 Suffrage Parade in D.C. Died on NWP speaking tour in the West in 1916.

Eunice Brannan, New York City: State chair of New York branch of NWP. Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Louise Bryant, New York City (formerly of Portland, Oregon): Author, poet, and Journalist.  Correspondent for Public Ledger of Philadelphia in Petrograd for 6 months during Russian revolution.  Arrested for Watchfire demonstrations in Feb. 1919 and sentenced to 5 days in DC jail.

Lucy Burns, New York City: Founded NWP with Alice Paul, editor of The Suffragist, served the most prison time of all suffragists, and was a “Prison Special” speaker.

Emily DuBois Butterworth, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Carrie Chapman Catt, New Castle: President of NAWSA twice. Revitalized the suffrage movement. Famous for her organizational skills and “Winning Plan”.

Mrs. Palys L. Chevrier, New York City: Participated in Watchfire demonstrations in 1919, jailed for five days. Also a “Prison Special” speaker.

Dorothy Day, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Janet Fotheringham, Buffalo: Picketed the White House in 1917. Arrested twice.

Margaret Fotheringham, Buffalo: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Anna Ginsberg, New York City: Participated in Watchfire demonstrations in Feb. 1919, jailed for five days.

Frances B. Green, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Elizabeth Hamilton, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Ernestine Hara, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Mrs. H.O. Havemeyer, New York City: Major contributor, organizer, and speaker. Member of “Prison Special” speaking tour. Participated in Watchfire demonstrations in Feb. 10, 1919, jailed for five days.

Louise Hornsby, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Jane Hunt, Waterloo: Called the Women’s Right Convention in 1848.

Paula Jakobi, New York City: Picketed Wilson’s White House in 1917 to protest Alice Paul’s treatment.

Mrs. R. Jerome Jeffery, Rochester: A club woman leader was president of the New York Federation of Colored Women, and member of the National Association of Colored Women (NACW) and the National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA).  Her photo was used in a racist anti-suffrage flyer.

Peggy B. Johns, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Amy R. Juengling, Buffalo: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Edna Kearns, New York City: In the 1913 New York suffrage campaign she hitched a horse to a suffrage campaign wagon called the “Spirit of 1776” and went all over Long Island and New York City to campaign for suffrage.

Ada Louise Kendall, Hamburg: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Hattie F. Kruger, Buffalo: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Kathryn Lincoln, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Maude Malone, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Victoria Earle Matthews, New York City: Matthews was an African American social worker, author, newspaper woman, settlement house leader, and social activist, who had moved from Georgia to New York City after the Civil War.  With little education, she became a journalist with T. Thomas Fortune’s New York Age and the Woman’s Era. She met Ida B. Wells when Wells came to New York to lecture against lynching.  Matthews was among the clubwomen attending the conference that led to the founding of the National Federation of Afro-American Women, a forerunner of the National Association of Colored Women (NACW).  She chaired the Executive Board of the NACW.

Mary Ann McClintock, Waterloo: With others called the Women’s Right Convention in 1848.

Vida Milholland, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Mrs. I. L. Moorman, New York City: Moorman was president of the Negro Women’s Business League in New York City.  Affiliated with white suffragist Alva Belmont, and presided over a meeting in which Black women discussed with Belmont the proposal for funding a meeting room for Black suffragists to be underwritten by Belmont under the auspices of Belmont’s organization, the Political Equality Association.  Moorman assured Belmont that Black women would “be glad of the opportunity of joining the [suffrage] movement.”  This appeared to be a significant meeting as the point of interracial suffrage cooperation was initiated in the campaign for the woman suffrage in New York.

Elizabeth Rogers, New York City: Chairman of NWP Advisory Council and “Prison Special” speaker.

Rose Schneiderman, New York City: Union leader and suffrage speaker, part of NAWSA contingent to visit President Wilson to ask for support for suffrage amendment.

Belle Sheinberg, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Seneca Falls: With others called the Women’s Right Convention in 1848, wrote and worked with Susan B. Anthony for suffrage and equal rights for women until her death.

Doris Stevens, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Elizabeth Stuyvesant, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated.

Mary Morris Burnett Talbert (1866-1923), Buffalo: She was an educator, lecturer, activist, suffrage supporter, and vice president of the National Association of Colored Women.  A graduate of Oberlin College, she married William Talbert founder of the Niagara Movement, which was a forerunner of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, on which she served as Vice President.  Her leadership in the Black Women’s Club movement developed Black female leadership and became a political voice for African American women.  She wrote suffrage articles for the Crisis magazine, and focused on political strategies to unify African American women.  She also helped save the Frederick Douglass home in DC.

Bertha Wallerstein, New York City: A student at Barnard College, she participated in the NWP Watchfire demonstration, was arrested in January 1919, and served 5 days in the DC jail.

Cora Week, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and released on personal bond.

Rosalie Whitney, Brooklyn: A member of the Brooklyn Woman’s Suffrage Party in 1917 and was the New York congressional chair in the Woman’s Federal Equality Association and a speaker for NAWSA at the House of Representatives suffrage amendment hearing in 1918.

Rose Winslow, New York City: Born in Poland, worked in factory in Pittsburgh. In 1916, spoke for suffrage throughout the West for NWP. Picketed the White House in 1917.

Martha Coffin Wright, Auburn, 10 miles east of Seneca Falls: With others called the Women’s Right Convention in 1848. She was Lucretia Mott’s sister.

Joy Young, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917, arrested, tried, sentenced, and incarcerated. Youngest NWP picketer arrested.

Matilda Young, New York City: Picketed the White House in 1917.